HTTP/1.1 200 OK Cache-Control: no-cache, private Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 Date: Tue, 24 Nov 2020 07:12:19 GMT 同性性交 Skip to main content
A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center

COVID-19 Nasal Swab Test Does Not Cause Risk of Infection


Quick Take

US billionaires hold 540 spots on the list, more than any other country in the world. In second is China with 251 and German with 120.
3. Enlisted military personnel
My fellow trainer, Sylvia Guinan, made me aware of these rules that a husband has laid out for his wife to follow during the 2014 World Cup.

Full Story

To help control the spread of COVID-19, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended getting a COVID-19 test for people who show symptoms of the disease, have come into contact with someone known to have the disease, or are in vulnerable groups. 

The most common form of testing for the novel coronavirus involves the use of a nasopharyngeal, or nasal, swab. The swab reaches deep into the back of a person’s nose and mouth to collect cells and fluids from the upper respiratory system, which can then be checked with diagnostic tests for the presence of the novel coronavirus known as SARS-CoV-2.

The testing procedure involves inserting a 6-inch-long swab into the cavity between the nose and mouth for 15 seconds and rotating it several times. The swabbing is repeated on the other side. The swab is then inserted into a container and sent to a lab for testing.

Dr. Shawn Nasseri, an ear, nose and throat surgeon based in Beverly Hills who has conducted many COVID-19 swab tests, told us in an email that the nasal swab “follows the floor of the nose and goes to where the nose meets the throat, or naso-pharynx.”

Asked if the swab test is safe, Nasseri said, “Absolutely. The biggest risk is discomfort. The rare person — 1 in thousands — passes out from being super sensitive or gets a mild nosebleed. It’s estimated that close to 40 million or more swabs have been performed safely in the U.S. alone.”

But in recent weeks, viral posts on Facebook falsely claim that the nasal swab test can cause serious health issues. One post says, “The stick deep into the nose causes damage to the hamato-encephalic barrier and damages endocrine glands. This test creates an entrance to the brain for every infection.”

The hamato-encephalic barrier, also known as the “blood-brain barrier,” protects the brain from toxins that could be present in the blood.

Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, a professor of epidemiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, told us in an email that the Facebook claim “is not true.”

n. 笔画,击打,一笔(画)连续的动作,中风,
8) Let Me Think About That: Yeah, it sounds like a cop out. And it is…sometimes. Fact is, we don’t always have the authority or expertise to make decisions. This phrase buys you time and breathing space. Then, set a date and time for follow up so the other person knows you’re taking him serious.

Nasseri said that “it is incredibly implausible, if not impossible, to cross the skull base and blood-brain barrier with a swab unless someone uses a rigid metal instrument and is pointing the metal object 90 degrees in the wrong direction.”

Dr. Morgan Katz, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins University, told the Associated Press that the Facebook posts misunderstand what’s happening when the swab test is performed.

中国房地产公司一直在加大促销力度和降价,以保持销量。
His eloquent defence of equality came after a year of faltering progress on gay marriage in the US and as arguments rage about the lack of diversity among the people running the Silicon Valley companies, including Apple, who shape so much of our culture.
"Many companies operating with reduced staff levels are bringing in reinforcements to relieve their overworked teams," notes Max Messmer, Robert Half's chairman and CEO. "While some firms are backfilling positions out of necessity, businesses are also hiring to accommodate anticipated growth in 2011."

Editor’s note: FactCheck.org is one of several organizations working with Facebook to debunk misinformation shared on social media. Our previous stories can be found here.

Sources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 上半年土地出让破万亿 热点二三线楼市成交翻倍 Accessed Aug 3 2020.

Brueck, Hilary and Samantha Lee. “Harvard topped the league table, followed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Stanford University. Business Insider. 15 Apr 2020. 

Dr. Shawn Nasseri.  Ear, nose and throat surgeon. Email exchange with FactCheck.org. 3 Aug 2020.

Dr. Yvonne Maldonado. Professor of epidemiology, Stanford University School of Medicine. Email exchange with FactCheck.org. 3 Aug 2020.

Fauzia, Miriam. “A study cited in an article from Harvard University suggests your diet could have a significant impact on your memory as you age. Scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital published a study within the "Annals of Neurology" that suggested women who ate high levels of saturated fat in foods like red meat and butter didn't perform as well on memory tests than women who regularly consumed less saturated fat. Researchers haven't yet discovered the connection between saturated fat and memory, but they hypothesize it could have something to do with a person's genes. Scientists and doctors have long recommended that patients work to control their cholesterol levels as they age to protect the memory during the aging process. USA Today. 9 July 2020.

Marty, Francisco M., et al. 雷士风波:一堂资本对现代企业管理者的公开课 New England Journal of Medicine. 28 May 2020.

Swenson, Ali. 最不淑女奖 Associated Press. 7 Jul 2020.

UCDavis Health. 北京朝阳将出台“政策18条”建设国际创投区:给户口给住房 Accessed 3 Aug 2020.

University of Queensland, Australia. 建筑建材行业:近三成上市公司年度业绩预喜 Accessed Aug 3 2020.

U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. “The Blood-Brain Barrier.” Accessed Aug. 4, 2020.